Jack Yan
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The Persuader

My personal blog, started in 2006.



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26.02.2010

When Swedes say it’s too cold, they mean –30°C

I thought it was cold enough in Stockholm when I hit town a month ago, and temperatures were in the –9°C to –15°C region most days (with a high of around –2°C). But, Stefan tells me, temperatures plummeted greatly over the past week, down into the –30°C region in some parts. Stockholm was in the minus 20s, but when you add the wind chill, we are talking –30°C, too. When the trains stop running in Sweden (though Rogernomics-style cutbacks on staff who would normally have cleared the snow have not helped), you know it’s frighteningly cold. These folks don’t panic at the first sign of snow and things ran as normal when I was there, but not with this sort of blizzard.
   Stefan does not know this but on the last day, I took a pic outside his window as a memento. He took one on the 24th to show me how cold it got. Here is a comparison (both are cropped to give roughly the same frame):

Outside Stefan’s apartment, January 27
January 27, 9.34 a.m.

Outside Stefan’s apartment, February 24
February 24, 10.16 a.m.

   Minus 15 is still cold enough for me, and if I am willing to brave that for Wellington (on my own money, incidentally) to study the public transport and meet with companies that can help us on the environmental angle, then I’m willing to do a lot for my city. I’d do –30°C if I have to, but bear in mind, such a trip would not have been terribly productive if everyone’s stuck at home and there’s 50 cm of snow at your door.

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Filed under: general, Sweden, Wellington—Jack Yan @ 10.52

One Response to ‘When Swedes say it’s too cold, they mean –30°C’

  1. […] things to deal with at the office. First, there wasn’t much snow in Rongotai, and I had enough of the white stuff in winter 2010. Secondly, who needs snowy entertainment when this saga unfolded on Gayatri Wood’s Facebook […]

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