Jack Yan
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The Persuader

My personal blog, started in 2006. No paid posts.



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07.03.2010

Do schools kill creativity?

Stefan Engeseth pasted this to his blog over the weekend, and it’s one of the best TED talks. As Stefan has investigated child behaviour himself, I can see the relevance. But even for the rest of us, it’s a thoroughly entertaining talk by Sir Ken Robinson in 2006 that has some wonderful touchpoints—and humour. It’s very apt when Sir Ken discusses the foundations of the educational system in the Industrial Revolution, and how we still make judgements based on its values.

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Filed under: culture, leadership, USA—Jack Yan @ 21.44

3 Responses to ‘Do schools kill creativity?’

  1. Lee Harris says:

    Come along to the EDtalks Symposium at Te Papa on Friday, March 26 – entitled Thought Leaders for a New Decade… they want key influencers (like yourself) to front up with the politicians and leading educationalists…

  2. Jack Yan says:

    Lee, count me in. I will email or Facebook you to see what the arrangements are.

  3. jaklumen says:

    Having been trained as a school teacher, and generally being VERY disenchanted and very jaded about the U.S. public school system, I sincerely wish there were more discussions like Robinson’s.

    The sad thing is that while there are inspiring stories like that of Gillian Lynne, few have the means socioeconomically to choose their education that way. Or simply put, parents will not support their children that way. (And I can speak to the latter: although it seems pretty evident to me now that I should go into the I.T. field, I had NO support in my hobbies concerning it as a child. None. Not to mention emphasis was all on the math and science of programming/coding/scripting, which I consistently seem to have little patience for.)

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