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The Persuader

My personal blog, started in 2006. No paid posts.



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13.01.2011

Bonne 50e anniversaire, Renault 4

Before there was the Twingo, there was the Renault 4. It celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, as I was reminded on Tumblr earlier today. From Autocade:

Image:Renault_4.jpgRenault 4 (R1121). 1961–94 (prod. 8,135,424). 5-door estate, utility convertible. F/F, 603, 747, 782, 845, 956, 1108 cm³ (4 cyl. OHV). Replacement for 4CV conceived as a response to Citroën 2CV, which was overtaking the Renault in sales. Soft suspension for rural buyers who might use 4s on the farm; front-wheel-drive transmission and four-wheel independent suspension. Separate chassis and body, rather than 4CV’s monocoque, for simplicity. Four-speed gearbox from 1968, the year of the 4’s facelift. GTL with 1·1-litre from 1978. Additional models added, such as fourgonette in 1962; limited-edition Parisienne in 1964 with a tartan pattern, in association with Elle magazine; Plein Air from 1968 to 1970; Rodeo from 1970 to 1987. Rebodied 4, called the Renault 6, from 1968, but the utilitarian 4 managed to outlive it. Billancourt production ceased 1987, with Slovenia the last country to put out a 4 in 1994.

   There was also its lesser known sibling, the Renault 3, a sort of poverty version of the 4:

Image:Renault_3.jpgRenault 3 (R1121). 1961–2 (prod. 2,526; other source lists 2,571). 5-door estate. F/F, 603 cm³ (4 cyl. OHV). Entry-level Renault based on the 4, but without any luxuries—no hubcaps, interior door trims, third side window, or grille. Engine in the 3CV class in France, but since a Renault 4L cost little more, most customers opted for the better specified car. Rugged and simple, rivalling base 2CVs as intended by Renault.

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Filed under: cars, culture, France—Jack Yan @ 08.48

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