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The Persuader

My personal blog, started in 2006. No paid posts.



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28.12.2017

Developer creates a tool to expose bigoted, fake Twitter accounts; Twitter bans it

You are currently browsing comments. If you would like to return to the full story, you can read the full entry here: “Developer creates a tool to expose bigoted, fake Twitter accounts; Twitter bans it”.


Filed under: business, culture, internet, social responsibility, technology, USA—Jack Yan @ 13.12

5 Responses to ‘Developer creates a tool to expose bigoted, fake Twitter accounts; Twitter bans it’

  1. […] scrambling to show the US government that it is doing something about alleged Russian interference, kick off a privately developed bot that helped identify fake accounts. You’d think that if Twitter were sincere about identifying fake accounts, it would embrace such […]

  2. […] racist Australian politician Fraser Anning, again demonstrating how fearful they are of racists. Twitter also deleted an account that looked for anti-Semitic bots, as bots are good for business (just as Facebook).    The Hong Kong police show their […]

  3. […] but we have been seeing signs in the latter part of the 2010s that Twitter is as bad as Facebook, with its love of bots, bigotry and its mass censorship. Now it’s as devoted to selling its users as the rest of Big Tech. The […]

  4. […] with this latest discovery, I’m having second thoughts. We all know Twitter censors, and protects bigots, and its latest way to make a quick buck crosses a line.    I know most people have lines […]

  5. […] I enjoyed that public law class with Prof Palmer, and I wish I could remember other direct quotations he made. (I remember various facts, just not sentences verbatim like that one—then again I don’t have the public law expertise of the brilliant Dr Caroline Morris, who sat behind me when we were undergrads.)    It’s still very civil on Mastodon, and one of the Tooters that I communicate with is an ex-Tweeter whose account was suspended. I followed that account and there was never anything, to my knowledge, that violated the TOS on it. But Twitter seems to be far harder to gauge in 2019–20 on just what will get you shut down. Guess it could happen any time to anyone. Shall we expect more in their election year? Be careful when commenting on US politics: it mightn’t be other Tweeters you need to worry about. And they could protect bots before they protect you. […]

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