Posts tagged ‘bug’


Check your Google Feedburner feeds: are they serving the correct sites?

09.01.2014

A month or so ago, our Feedburner stats for Lucire’s RSS feed delivery tanked. I put it down to the usual “Google being useless”, because we would have expected to see the opposite. The take-up of Feedburner feeds has usually slowly grown since we started this one in 2007, without any promotion on our end.
   I clicked through the Feedburner link on the site this morning to discover this:

That’s not our site. Maybe on seeing the wrong content, we lost a bunch of subscribers?
   Now, I did change the ID for the feed, but that was last week, not December 11–12. Maybe I’m naïve, but I don’t expect Google to allow the hijacking of a feed ID that rapidly, since Google forbids, for example, people taking up old Blogger names. Unless they have inconsistent policies between their properties? Or maybe Feedburner is broken and dying—the complaints have been coming for a long time.
   Now’s a good time to check your feeds anyway, if you use Google’s Feedburner service, to make sure that they are still serving the correct sites.
   The changes did not affect those who were getting Feedburner updates via their email (since I’m on that mailing list myself).
   Since I can’t trust Google with anything, we’ve changed our RSS feed to the one natively supported by Wordpress.

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Posted in internet, publishing | 3 Comments »


I’m not the only one who has a problem with Internet Explorer

21.06.2012

I realize software crashes can happen to anyone at any time, even Microsoft Windows president Steve Sinofsky, when demonstrating the new Microsoft Surface tablets in front of an audience in Los Angeles.
   However, it does remind me of the year where Internet Explorer 9 would not work on any of our computers. The question must be asked: if one of Microsoft’s own bosses can’t get Internet Explorer to work, what hope do the rest of us have?

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Posted in humour, internet, technology, USA | 2 Comments »


It’s the 1st of the month, so Facebook Timeline stops updating

01.11.2011

I know I’m not alone on this, as I have heard from two other Facebook friends, but Facebook has trouble getting to a new month with Timeline.
   Ever since my Facebook went to November 1, Timeline stopped updating. What rests there is the last post of October 31.
   Earlier today, I could still have a look at November entries by forcing the URL www.facebook.com/jack.yan/timeline/2011/11, but that eventually stopped working, too.
   There’s no November entry in the month links at the top right-hand corner, either.
   The only way I can see my Facebook entries is in the full history. Yet no one seems to have reported this bug, which only happens on the 1st of the month. Looks like I’ll have to.

PS.: Facebook Timeline finally made it to November, presumably because the US west coast got there. I assume Facebook is unaware that there are a lot of time zones ahead of Pacific time?

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Posted in internet, technology, USA | 11 Comments »


It’s nice to be believed

21.04.2011

The bug I wrote about a few days ago that’s emerging when I use Autocade is now filed with Telstra Clear—and it’s been escalated.
   For years I would report various faults, including with Telstra Clear, and I would not be believed. What a difference now that I am believed.
   For around two years, no one at Telstra Clear believed me when I told them that the internet went down when it was windy. They kept blaming me and how I used my computer. I guess the wisdom was that wind caused computer operator misuse. Until one day, I said, ‘I know what your script says. I have done [x, y and z]. Now, here’s what I want you to do.’ The technician came down from Palmerston North and confirmed there was a loose wire. He then called another technician. Zero marks for efficiency, though the error was eventually fixed.
   Or the Vox error, which went on for months in 2009, blocking me from using the service. When I complained to Six Apart, which ran the now-defunct blogging platform, it was apparently my fault. Or my ISP’s. Or the internet’s. Until, again after a long, long time, I gave them my username and password. Only then did they confirm that something was wrong: they could not log on as me even from their own HQ.
   Even Mozilla took its time, though happily, when they got on to it, they were remarkably quick in solving my reported bugs. And these days, I find I am not disbelieved there.
   Now that Lucire is on Cloudflare, I’m also finding that speedy service and, last night, confirmation that they did, indeed, suffer a DDOS attack. There are no doubts there, either—just rapid acknowledgements and very personal service, answering my concerns about various settings, the Google bot, and the way Cloudflare works.
   The latest one is the Google Ads Preferences Manager, though I was told today at our monthly Vista lunch by Jim Donovan that he had been checking his, and found that his opt-out had been respected. I wonder if Google is only respecting the choices of Chrome users.
   I have had a few friends discover their Ads Preferences Manager behave the same way as it does for me, but maybe there are some people for whom it’s working.
   Nevertheless, the Network Advertising Initiative, to whom I have informed of this issue, has not responded, which I imagine amounts to being disbelieved.
   All I can say to the disbelievers is this: I am a reasonably intelligent person. I have been playing and working with computers since 1978. That means, if I say there is a bug with your service, there is a greater chance that I am right, than there is for your belief that I mucked up.
   This time, it’s plain nice for Telstra Clear to come back to me without questioning how I use my computer. Or saying I pressed the wrong button. Or used the wrong finger in pressing that button. Here’s hoping it can be resolved for, as the tech told me yesterday, it’s very hard to identify an intermittent error. (However, today it is not intermittent: I have been consistently unable to get on to Autocade without adding www to its URL.) From my point of view, it’s just great that the right people are dealing with the right issue in my world.

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Posted in business, internet, New Zealand, technology, USA | No Comments »


How do you take a screen shot when Alt-Print Screen stops working?

02.12.2010

This is an error that happens to me at least twice a week for years, and no one seems to have a solution. I’ve read some of the help pages on this in web searches, and none of them help.
   As far as I can tell, only one case of this has been reported, but, sadly, the original thread cannot be readily found any more. Most have turned up in fake support sites. (The search phrase is Alt-Printscreen And Ctrl-V Only Works 3X—while I have not counted mine, I’d say this isn’t far off the mark.)
   How do you do a screen shot in Windows (XP or Vista) when Alt-Print Screen stops working?
   And, how and why does it stop working?
   Usually the solution is to reboot. Sometimes, however, rebooting isn’t a desirable option—such as in cases when I need a screen shot of something that I know I won’t be able to get back.
   Let me state some of the things that have been posted by well meaning people elsewhere that have not worked for me.
   Clearing the clipboard doesn’t work. (The usual copy and paste commands still work with text though.)
   On this computer, I don’t have a Function key, but even on my laptop, where I do have one, it’s not activated.
   I don’t have a second monitor plugged in.
   I haven’t installed Boot Camp, whatever that is.
   I don’t think it’s a memory issue because I have oodles more memory today than I did on my old machine.
   I don’t use Microsoft Office—I say this as some of the advice is around how an Office installation will screw up Alt-Print Screen.
   I used to think it was Photoshop, because, on my old computer, I could shut down the program and reopen it, and Alt-Print Screen would usually work again. Or, I could shut down one version and open another. However, these tricks have now ceased to work, though I have a feeling that they once worked on this machine.
   I’d like to say it is Chrome-related, because I have never been able to take a screen shot of the ‘Aw, snap!’ error page that comes up frequently. Whether there’s something related to the graphics, the crashes and Flash, I don’t know. Browsers crash so many times a day now that it’s hard to pinpoint whether the crashes are the cause of Alt-Print Screen failing, or whether the command had failed beforehand.
   But I’ve had these problems long before Chrome was even released, so we can’t blame Google (again).
   I’m putting this post up in case someone has some suggestions and future computer users can find this.
   The closest I have found to a real explanation is from Adobe, on a related issue:

That sounds a bit like an old Windows bug where the OS would stop informing Photoshop of changes to the clipboard after a while (we never determined the cause, but saw the same thing happen in other apps, and reported the problem to Microsoft).

   And, please, no unhelpful ‘Buy a Mac’ comments. You guys are seldom around when I Tweet about Mac problems (believe me, they screw up just as often, with everything from missing icons to stuck DVDs to files that disappear mid-transfer to fonts that don’t show up in a PDF even when subsetting is on …), and the Windows people never say, ‘Buy a PC.’

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Posted in general, internet, technology | 2 Comments »


Another false accusation from Google

02.12.2010

For around a year, I’ve been at Google for its misbehaviours. And one thing I dislike about these tech companies—whether it’s Facebook or Google or any of their ilk—is how they are slaves to technology, rather than masters of it. Somewhere along the line, they have allowed algorithms to determine guilt, thereby offending that old-fashioned idea of the presumption of innocence. From Blogger blocks to false copyright-infringement accusations to, now, this:

Blocked from searching on Google

   While Duck Duck Go is my default now, occasionally I’ll still put a search through Google. There is no malware on this system, or on this network, and I certainly haven’t put through a single automated request (how could human typing be mistaken for this?!)—reasons Google gives for this message. It’s just another case of guilty till proved innocent that this northern California company, and others, are so good at creating.
   Funny, isn’t it, that it has relied on an automated process to accuse a human process of being automated? It’s the Blogger fight all over again.

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Posted in business, internet, USA | No Comments »


Hong Kong disappears from Cities I’ve Visited app?

04.02.2010

I have a feeling something is wrong with Cities I’ve Visited on Facebook. (Actually, something’s been wrong for a long time, either with the application, Facebook, or something between the two.) Not only has it not published new cities I’ve entered on this most recent trip, I now notice that while the important metropolis of Porirua, New Zealand has been included in the system, Hong Kong has disappeared from its database.
   I was wondering why my country count had dropped by one, and to my surprise, my place of birth is no longer considered major enough for inclusion by TripAdvisor’s travel app.

PS.: TripAdvisor says it has known of this error since late January, and has no idea how Hong Kong and Macau disappeared. The cities will be reinstated after it discovers how they were removed from the service, as it has done nothing to effect that removal.—JY

P.PS.: As of February 6, Hong Kong is back on the map.—JY

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Posted in internet | No Comments »


When Facebook robs you of having a profile pic

29.01.2010

I will have more from my Swedish and French tour soon, but I will say that I had a marvellous time in Malmö and Lund on my first day in Sweden (especially getting a feel for Lund’s environmental programmes), Kristianstad and Hassleholm on my second, and on my return to Stockholm. A big-up to Stefan Engeseth and all the marketing and theatre groups who made me feel like a visiting dignitary. Paris, from where I write, has been wonderful to me once again, and it was wonderful joining my colleagues at the Medinge Group for Brands with a Conscience 2010.
   I also owe Facebook visitors an explanation on why I do not have a profile picture. The simple answer is that Facebook does not work, and I guess no one at Facebook has tested the software. Again.
   I select a photo from my album, right? The link I use is the one below:

Then, presumably, I choose the photograph I want:

I then ask Facebook to make this my profile picture with the link down the bottom right:

To which Facebook confirms my choice:

Only thing is, this doesn’t work. Here’s Facebook’s response to that confirmation:

Not particularly useful. Sure enough, it removed my prior photograph and this is what I see:

   We have become so used to using Facebook as our badges or masks, showing the world who we are. The inability to do something that everyone else can makes one feel very incomplete. In some cases, we feel Facebook is an extension of our personal brands.

Speaking of disability, Pete tells me that if one uses Opera, one cannot post or comment on Vox. Why am I not surprised?

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Posted in branding, internet, marketing | 8 Comments »